Basic Fantasy Field Guide 2

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SmootRK
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Maggot-man, Worm that Walks

Post Sun Feb 14, 2016 9:39 am

Maggot-man
Armor Class: 17 ‡
Hit Dice: 4** (or more)
No. of Attacks: 1
Damage: 1d6 +special
Movement: 30'
No. Appearing: 1
Save As: MU 8
Morale: 9
Treasure Type: U, V in lair
XP: 1015 (based upon MU-8 equivalent level)

Usually encountered wearing voluminous hooded robes, the Maggot-man is a strange form of semi-undead remains of a powerful necromancer. Should the hood be removed or otherwise true form be revealed, the "worm that walks" appears as a terrifying writhing mass of maggots in human form. A character that sees the true-form of the maggot-man must save vs spells (at -2 penalty) or else be affected as if struck by a Cause Fear Spell (reverse of Remove Fear) causing the affected to flee for 2 turns. Anyone affected that is unable to flee will cower in place, unable to act otherwise. Even those who successfully save are unnerved by the sight, and will have a -2 penalty to attacks or actions against the "worm that walks".

A maggot-man remains very intelligent and can cast spells as a Magic-User equivalent to twice its hit dice (ie. 8th level for the hit dice listed above). If the Game Master utilizes the optional Necromancer supplement, then the maggot-man will usually be a necromancer instead. In addition to spells the maggot-man may attack physically by striking a foe. Anyone struck by a maggot-man has a 2 in 6 chance (1-2 on a d6 roll) of being affected by a special form of Rot Grub (core rules). Anyone that subsequently dies from the rot grub will rise as a special sort of zombie under the control of the maggot-man for a short time as maggots strip the flesh off of the bones (2d4 days). If the maggot-man is defeated while such a rot-grub zombie endures, then the maggot-man will come to inhabit that body, effectively rising again in a new mass of maggots from that corpse. As such, the maggot-man will usually have one such infected zombie hidden away somewhere as a contingency, though this requires a fairly regular supply of fresh corpses to maintain.

A maggot-man can only be hit by magical weapons or spells and like skeletons, they take only half damage from edged weapons, and only a single point from arrows, bolts or sling stones (plus any magical bonus). As with all undead, they can be Turned by a Cleric (as vampire), and are immune to sleep, charm or hold spells.
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Deep Ones

Post Sun Feb 14, 2016 8:56 pm

Following my recent delve into things Lovecraft, here is one of the best. Deep Ones were clearly inspirational for Kuo-toan or Sauhagin, though I find them scarier than either...largely for the manner in which they are "hidden among us" and the secret cult stuff.
Although Deep Ones appear in other games/editions, my contributions here are from-scratch creations based only upon the source material that is now in public domain... as such they should be completely publishable.

Deep Ones
Deep Ones are a race of picean-beings, combining qualities of fish, amphibian, and humanoid traits. Deep Ones revere ancient elder beings of the deep that likely predate the arrival of the gods of humans, dwarves, and the like.

Deep ones will secretly trade and form pacts with humanoids in coastal communities. These pacts inevitably include dark rituals, sacrifices, and even inter-breeding with the humanoid populations. The hybrids from such unions often rise to power within secret cults of dark god-beings.

Deep One, Common
Armor Class: 16
Hit Dice: 3+3
No. of Attacks: 2 claws or by weapon
Damage: 1d4 claws or by weapon
Movement: 20', Swim 30'
No. Appearing: 1d8, Lair 5d8
Save As: Fighter: 3
Morale: 8
Treasure Type: A
XP: 145

Common Deep Ones are scaled humanoids resembling both frog and fish. Their huge unblinking eyes give them darkvision 60' and superior eyesight while underwater. Their clawed hands and feet are webbed enabling exceptional swimming ability. As inhuman as a deep one looks, they can produce offspring from unions with various humanoids that look completely normal (for the non-Deep One stock).

Communities of deep ones are found in deep water, but generally within proximity of coastal humanoid settlements. In such a community one will find more powerful deep ones with additional powers.

“I think their predominant color was a greyish-green, though they had white bellies. They were mostly shiny and slippery, but the ridges of their backs were scaly. Their forms vaguely suggested the anthropoid, while their heads were the heads of fish, with prodigious bulging eyes that never closed. At the sides of their necks were palpitating gills, and their long paws were webbed. They hopped irregularly, sometimes on two legs and sometimes on four. I was somehow glad that they had no more than four limbs. Their croaking, baying voices, clearly used for articulate speech, held all the dark shades of expression which their staring faces lacked... They were the blasphemous fish-frogs of the nameless design – living and horrible…”
-H.P. Lovecraft, The Shadow Over Innsmouth


Deep One, Hybrid
Armor Class: 14
Hit Dice: 1+1
No. of Attacks: 2 claws or by weapon
Damage: 1d2 claws or by weapon
Movement: 30', Swim 20'
No. Appearing: 2d4, Lair 4d8
Save As: Fighter: 1
Morale: 7
Treasure Type: C
XP: 25

Deep One Hybrids start off life as a normal member of their humanoid parent's race. In fact, in the beginning most are completely unaware of their connection to those dwellers of the deep. Over time the hybrid slowly transforms into a true deep one as it takes on traits such as glassy unblinking eyes, small or complete lack of ears, webbing between fingers and toes, or folds along one's neck that eventually become gills. As the traits develop the hybrid individual becomes reclusive and increasingly of an alien mindset. The full transformation takes a variable amount time, though not usually completing before the individual becomes middle-aged. When the traits become too obvious to conceal the hybrid departs society to join with the deep ones.

While still within his humanoid community, a deep one hybrid will continue with a traditional trade or profession while operating in secret cults with dark rituals, furthering the sect's vile goals. It is possible that such a hybrid has class-based abilities; as such, the individual may have substantially different stats than those listed above which represent a basic mid-point in the hybrid's transformation.
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Infernal, Hezrou

Post Wed Feb 17, 2016 6:39 pm

Infernal, Hezrou*
Armor Class: 22
Hit Dice: 10** (AB +9)
No. of Attacks: 2 claws/ 1 bite or spell
Damage: 1d4 claw, 4d4 bite
Movement: 30’
No. Appearing: 1d4
Save As: Fighter: 10
Morale: 11
Treasure Type: C
XP: 1480

Cruel and somewhat stupid, Hezrou are demonic troglodyte-like humanoids which are slightly more powerful than vrocks (Field Guide). A hezrou enjoys melee combat even more than most other demonic denizens. A hezrou eagerly presses an attack deep into the heart of enemy forces.

Like troglodytes, a hezrou secretes a smelly oil that keeps its scaly skin supple. All mammals (including, of course, all the standard character races) find the scent repulsive, and those within 10 feet of the infernal must make a saving throw versus poison. Those failing the save suffer a -2 penalty to attack rolls while they remain within range of the hezrou. Getting out of range negates the penalty, but renewed exposure reinstates the penalty. The results of the original save last a full 24 hours, after which a new save must be rolled.

Hezrou can freely communicate telepathically, and have 60' Darkvision. Each can teleport at will (as 10th-level magic-user). Additionally, a hezrou can cause fear (this effect is identical to that produced by a wand of fear) as its action for a round of combat. Once per day a Hezrou has a 25% chance of summoning another of it's own kind.
Last edited by SmootRK on Wed Feb 24, 2016 8:36 am, edited 7 times in total.
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Ushac

Post Fri Feb 19, 2016 5:38 pm

Ushac
Armor Class: 11 (or armor worn)
Hit Dice: 1-1*
No. of Attacks: 1 weapon
Damage: by weapon
Movement: 30’
No. Appearing: 1d8
Save As: Normal Man
Morale: 9
Treasure Type: Q each; C in lair
XP: 13

Cheerful and willing to help, Ushac are (sadly) the perfect minion race. Dwarf-sized with purple skin, grey eyes, cat-like ears, and bushy dodger-blue hair and beards, ushac are not inherently bad creatures. However, an ushac is quite easy to charm or otherwise dominate, much to the delight of wicked spellcasters.

Each ushac may cast light (or its reverse, darkness) and purify food and water, each once per day. These innate powers are forever cast at first level of ability, even if the ushac takes on a character class (see below). In addition to these spell-like powers, an ushac not in metal armor is stealthy like a thief having a 25% chance to move silently and a 10% chance to hide in shadows. One does not get additional thief-like abilities unless he is actually a member of the thief class.

Most ushac are unarmored and carry only a dagger for defense. Tribal protectors (about one-third of the population) wear leather or chain armor and will carry a medium sized weapon such as a short sword, hammer, hand axe, or sometimes using slings. Their dwarf-like stature likewise limits weapon choice to those a dwarf can use (specifically excluding two-handed swords, polearms, and longbows).

Noted for their gullibility and lack of resistance to charms, an ushac saves against such related effects and spells at -4 penalty (charm spell, suggestion, illusions, siren's songs, among others). Such effects tend to have longer durations as well when used against an ushac (double any such durations). Note that illusions and the like do not last longer, only the ongoing or lingering effects upon the ushac itself.

Some ushacs, often leaders within their communities, advance as characters, and can be members of the Cleric, Fighter, or Thief classes. For NPC or PC Ushac characters, the individual may not have a Wisdom score higher than 16. Ushac vision is equal to human ability.

Code: Select all

Reference illustration comes from 1897

Title: The Giant Crab and Other Tales from Old India
Author: W.H.D. Rouse
Illustrator: W. Robinson
from the story, "The Goblin and the Sneeze"
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/36039/36039-h/36039-h.htm
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Fyrenewt

Post Sun Feb 21, 2016 3:19 pm

Fyrenewt
Armor Class: 16 (12)
Hit Dice: 2+2*
No. of Attacks: 1 weapon +special
Damage: by weapon
Movement: 30'
No. Appearing: 3d8 caravan, lair 10d10
Save As: Fighter: 2
Morale: 8
Treasure Type: individuals Q, S, U; lair B
XP: 100

Usually found in arid regions of volcanic activity, a Fyrenewt is perhaps distantly related to wugs (Field Guide) or lizardmen (Core Rules). A fyrenewt has the general appearance of a man-sized humanoid amphibian of the salamander sort. Rather than slick or slimy, a fyrenewt's skin is rather rough and sandy in texture and is of hues of crimson tinted browns. Fyrenewts speak their own language.

The typical fyrenewt warrior wears armor predominantly of chain links and wields a metal weapon such as a sword or metal shafted lance (spear). In addition to such weapon attack, the fyrenewt can breath forth a spray (cone) of fluid that instantly ignites on contact with air. This breath weapon is usable no more than once every ten rounds, and causes 2d4 damage (or half if a save vs. dragon breath) to any creatures within 10 feet in front of the fyrenewt.

As one would expect, a fyrenewt is immune to non-magical fire attacks, and even against magical fire sources takes only half damage (or less if a save would reduce the damage; and this save is made at +4). Conversely, cold-based attacks used against a fyrenewt causes double damage and the fyrenewt has an additional -2 penalty on the appropriate saves.

Fyrenewts have stronger leaders that wear plate (AC 18) and have 4+4 hit dice (280 XP). Such leader's breath weapon cause 4d4 damage (1d4 per hit die). There may be even stronger chieftains or kings. Any particular individual fyrenewt may also be a priest with clerical levels equivalent to one's hit die (about 1 in 4 will have clerical ability). These clerical members prefer spells involving heat, flame, or fire. If the Game Master utilizes the optional druid supplement, then the fyrenewt may choose fire oriented spells from the druid spell list. Even traditional spells are often cast in such a way as to include fire, smoke, heat or the like in ways that are cosmetic only. For instance, a Protection from Evil spell might appear to line the fyrenewt in a flame-like aura.

Fyrenewt communities often trade their forged weapons with other beings. Because their homes are toxic dangerous locales, the fyrenewts are often the ones who form well guarded caravans that are encountered.
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Aeromi

Post Sat Feb 27, 2016 9:34 am

Aeromi
Armor Class: 12 (12)
Hit Dice: 1
No. of Attacks: 2 claws, or 1 weapon
Damage: 1d4 claw or by weapon
Movement: 30' unarmored, glide 90', climb 20'
No. Appearing: 2d4, Wild 3d6, Lair 10d6
Save As: Fighter: 1
Morale: 8
Treasure Type: Q, R each; D in lair
XP: 25

The arboreal Aeromi are fur covered humanoids about 4 to 5 feet in height with a long bushy tail. Each has relatively long limbs ending in claws primarily used for climbing, but make for formidable weapons as well. They are quite dextrous (accounting for the armor class). Each aeromi has stretchable skin between its upper and lower limbs, and along the side of its body (a patagium) that allows it to glide effectively between trees. This patagium is not continuous but instead is anchored in key points on its body and limbs. Aeromi seem to have features of squirrel or lemur, and that of humanoids, though clearly not closely related to either. Aeromi speak their own language that includes various clicks and chittering, but many also speak common to some degree.

Aeromi are nocturnal and have Darkvision to a range of 90 feet when outdoors even on the darkest of nights. On a clear night with ample star or moonlight, an aeromi can see nearly as well as a human can in daylight. In areas indoors or underground the aeromi can see with 30' Darkvision. An aeromi suffers a -1 attack penalty in bright sunlight or within the radius of a spell causing magical light.

Aeromi climb readily among the massive redwood and sequoia trees that one lives among. Aeromi villages are build upon platforms and bridges in the upper reaches of these forests. An aeromi tends to carry little to allow mobility, but may utilize belts and clothing that can be fastened about its body in between the anchor points of its patagium. Aeromi may utilize humanoid weaponry when needed.

One out of every eight aeromi will be a warrior of 2 Hit Dice (75 XP). Regular aeromi gain a +1 bonus to their morale if they are led by such a warrior. In aeromi villages, one out of every twelve will be a sub-chief of 4 Hit Dice (240 XP) with 1d6 claw attacks. In lairs of 30 or more, there will be a aeromi chieftain of 6 Hit Dice (500 XP) that does 2d4 damage with each claw attack. In the village, aeromi never fail a morale check as long as the chieftain is alive. In addition, each village has a chance equal to 1-2 on 1d6 of a shaman being present. A shaman is equivalent to a warrior aeromi statistically, but has clerical (druid if that optional supplement is utilized by the Game Master) abilities at level 1d4+1. In a similar fashion, there is a chance equal to 1 on 1d6 for a witchdoctor. A witchdoctor aeromi has 1d4 levels of clerical (druid) and magic-user ability. Occasionally aeromi have been known to have class skills and to go off adventuring and exploring beyond the bounds of its home forest.
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Sasquatch

Post Sun Feb 28, 2016 8:26 am

As a creature with many legends and myths surrounding it, I could perhaps use some input from others to help come up with something that can fit with others' perceptions.
That said, I do not have any bionics included in my version.

Note: locally we have such a sasquatch myth within Pike National Forest. This is a meaner version than most media portrayals, being a hunter that takes down massive elk as his primary prey.

Sasquatch
Armor Class: 15
Hit Dice: 5+5
No. of Attacks: 2 fists
Damage: 1d6 fist
Movement: 30' unarmored, climb 20'
No. Appearing: 1-3, Lair 2d6
Save As: Fighter: 5
Morale: 8
Treasure Type: none
XP: 360

Sasquatch are a seldom seen large humanoid. They are clearly related in some distant way to apes and or neanderthals, but may be an entirely separate branch of humankind's kin. Each is over 7 feet in height, has long arms for even this great height, and yet walks upright most of the time. A sasquatch is covered in shaggy hair befitting its environment so that it can hide effectively when it does not want to be seen. When more than one is spotted, it is usually a family group with young. A sasquatch seems to be able to communicate with others of its kind, but its actual language is a mystery. That said, it seems to be able to understand complex concepts and its ability to mimic sounds is extraordinary. Sasquatch do not seem to keep treasures that other races seek, though one might find various crude objects and trinkets where one lairs.

The sasquatch has nocturnal vision that is superior to human sight, though it does not have actual Darkvision that can be utilized underground or in areas of total darkness. A sasquatch climbs nearly as easily as moving about by foot. Even for its size, the sasquatch hides in its home environment as easily as a halfling can in forested areas (with only 10% chance of detection), however they do not have this ability in other environments such as indoors or underground. A sasquatch is essentially immune to cold environmental effects and even extreme or magical cold causes only half-damage. If a save is involved with such a cold-based effect, it receives a +4 bonus. Sasquatch fight effectively with their fists, but if a weapon is theoretically used the sasquatch would have +2 on its attacks due to its tremendous strength.

Most sasquatch encounters have been largely benign meetings where both parties have simply surprised each other. Many sasquatch are generally peaceful denizens of their forest, though local legends speak of brutal hunters among their kind.
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Uktena

Post Sun Feb 28, 2016 11:01 am

Another one coming from Native American myth. Possibly should be named/categorized under Snake, Uktena.

Uktena
Armor Class: 15
Hit Dice: 9*
No. of Attacks: 1 bite
Damage: 2d6 bite (plus poison)
Movement: 40', swim 30'
No. Appearing: 1
Save As: Fighter: 9
Morale: 9
Treasure Type: J, L
XP: 1,150

The Uktena is a great horned water serpent, as large around as a tree trunk with bright blazing crest on its forehead and scales that glow along the edges like some inner fire. Some have described the horns as ram-like and others as moose or stag antlers, though it does not use the horns for attack. Uktena fear thunderbirds and will usually retreat to watery depths when one is near. An uktena keeps some treasures in its lair, generally acquired from victims.

The uktena's bite is powerful and those bitten must also save vs poison with a -2 penalty or fall comatose immediately and eventually die within 2d4 turns. Making matters worse, the uktena's brilliant crest allows it to charm monster against one target, once per turn (as the spell) against mammalian creatures (most character races included), and those affected will simply move towards the horned serpent and remain so that the uktena may consume at leisure. An opponent that averts its gaze, is blinded, or otherwise cannot see the jewel-like crest will not be affected by the charm attack.
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Tick, Giant

Post Sat Mar 05, 2016 9:08 am

Tick, Giant
Armor Class: 14
Hit Dice: 1*
No. of Attacks: 1 bite
Damage: 1d3 bite + blood drain, disease
Movement: 10'
No. Appearing: 1d6
Save As: Fighter: 1
Morale: 7 (special)
Treasure Type: nil
XP:

A Giant Tick is a blood sucking insect about a foot long and is a more active hunter than its smaller kin. One typically first attacks by dropping out of a tree or otherwise from a height when prey walks by, usually with complete surprise. It weighs little when not engorged, so usually the victim does not notice when a tick drops upon him. Adding to this, the tick's bite has an anesthetic quality, so the victim must save vs poison to notice the bite, which still causes 1d3 points of damage regardless. The Game Master should roll or otherwise keep results of these saving throws secret. Whether or not it is noticed, the tick drains blood for 1d4 points of damage every subsequent turn until either the victim dies or 20 such points of damage are drained. The hit points drained are not immediately noticed by the character until the attached tick is realized. Each turn the victim may save again to notice the attached tick. After draining the mentioned 20 hit points from a target (or the target dies), the tick will drop off to finish its breeding cycle again. An attached tick does not need to roll morale.

The tick is very durable and difficult to remove. Using brute force requires a Strength ability check (p.153 of core rules), but this will cause an additional 1d4 points of damage to the attached victim. Even killing the tick will not cause its head to be removed, so even with extreme care and taking over ten minutes will still cause the victim 1 additional point of damage during the process. Applying fire to a still live tick may cause it to release the character (the tick may save vs death ray with failure causing tick to drop off) but will often cause the afflicted character 1d3 points of damage in the process.

Making matters worse, the giant tick often carries a disease. The bitten character must save again vs poison or else be afflicted with a poison that causes 1 point of Constitution drain each day until death or cure disease spell is applied. While such disease is active, the character may not heal this constitution drain through rest, as described on p.52 of the core rules.

Giant ticks are fairly rare in most areas, as they decimate the fauna in a small region to subsequently starve themselves out, but may be more common in regions that have larger prey such as regions of prehistoric giant beasts.
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Tree-Fox

Post Sat Mar 05, 2016 12:28 pm

Tree-Fox
Armor Class: 16
Hit Dice: 1
No. of Attacks: 2 claws, 1 bite
Damage: 1d3 claws, 1d4 bite
Movement: 40', climb 30'
No. Appearing: 2d4
Save As: Fighter: 1
Morale: 8
Treasure Type: None
XP:

The feral Tree-Fox is a rather squirrel-like mammal in overall shape, though substantially larger. They are not actually related to squirrels, but more closely to that of foxes or other canines. Their claws are used for climbing and make for effective attacks as well. Tree-foxes will form small packs to improve their hunting effectiveness. They are sometimes domesticated by forest dwellers for use as guardians or pets.

There is a wide variety of tree-fox coloration and overall appearance. Some tree-fox breeds are so large as to have 2 or more hit dice and stronger attacks, and these varieties appear more wolf-like, so much as to be called "tree-wolves". Thankfully, they are quite rare.
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