Basic Fantasy Field Guide 2

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SmootRK
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Boar, Polar

Post Sat Feb 07, 2015 8:14 am

Boar, Polar
Armor Class: 15
Hit Dice: 5
No. of Attacks: 1 tusk
Damage: 2d6
Movement: 50' (10')
No. Appearing: Wild 1d6
Save As: Fighter: 5
Morale: 9
Treasure Type: None
XP: 360

Due to the extremes of their habitat, polar boars have an even nastier temperament than regular boars. One will typically charge then gore its opponent with its sharp tusks. Females and males are equally dangerous. A polar boar is essentially immune to cold environmental effects and even extreme or magical cold causes only half-damage. If a save is involved with such a cold-based effect, it receives a +4 bonus.

A polar boar is covered in thick motled white fur and even thicker layer of fatty blubber than normal swine. Adults are about 6 feet long and 4 feet high at the shoulder. While quite rare due to the difficulty in domesticating, a polar boar is large enough to be ridden or to pull sleds used by some northern Dwarf clans.
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SmootRK
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Elchman

Post Sat Feb 07, 2015 9:23 am

Elchman
Armor Class: 16 (14)
Hit Dice: 9
No. of Attacks: 1 gore or 1 weapon
Damage: 2d6 or by weapon (+3)
Movement: 30' Unarmored 40'
No. Appearing: 1d6, Wild 2d4, Lair 4d8
Save As: Fighter: 9
Morale: 9
Treasure Type: B
XP: 1075

An Elchman resembles a bull-headed minotaur, only substantially larger and having the massive head and antlers of a northern moose. Each elchman stands greater than 15 feet tall. Luckily they are largely solitary wanderers of northern marsh or lake riddled lands. An elchman can be quite aggressive if one comes too near, but are otherwise fairly docile when left alone.

An elchman usually attacks with its massive antler rack but may also use a weapon with a +3 damage bonus due to its great strength. Elchmen shed their antlers each year, so there are periods when one's antlers are too small to attack with. While each is completely furred, an elchman will wear additional hides or furs from creatures such as bears or wolves, but never from herbivores. Like most inhabitants of the northern climes, an elchman is essentially immune to cold environmental effects and even extreme or magical cold causes only half-damage. If a save is involved with such a cold-based effect, one receives a +4 bonus.
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SmootRK
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Bear, Ghost

Post Sat Feb 07, 2015 12:21 pm

Bear
Bears attack by rending opponents with their claws, dragging them in and biting them. A successful hit with both paws indicates a hug attack for additional damage (as given for each specific bear type). All bears are very tough to kill, and are able to move and attack for one round after losing all hit points.

Bear, Ghost
Armor Class: 16 ‡
Hit Dice: 9*
No. of Attacks: 2 claws, 1 bite + hug
Damage: 1d6 claws, 1d6 bite, 2d6 hug
Movement: 40'
No. Appearing: 1, Wild 1d4, Lair 1d4
Save As: Fighter:
Morale: 8
Treasure Type: None
XP: 1150

While the term ghost-bear (or spirit-bear) usually refers to rare black bears with white coats, these Ghost Bears are actual undead semi-material bears. When the ghost bear roars it causes fear in similar fashion as the reverse of the spell Remove Fear, except that it causes all creatures within 120' to become frightened; those that fail to save vs. Spells, will flee for 2 turns. Creatures with 6 or more hit dice are immune to this effect. The ghost bear will roar every 1d4 rounds in addition to any standard attacks.

The ghost bear confronts opponents in normal bear fashion with claws and bites. Upon scoring a hug attack the target is also drained of 1d3 points of Constitution. Elves and dwarves (and other long-lived creatures such as dragons) are allowed a saving throw vs. Death Ray to resist this effect, which must be rolled each time a hug attack occurs. Characters who lose Constitution appear to have aged. If a ghost bear is fighting a living creature which does not have a Constitution score, the Game Master should assign whatever score he or she sees fit.

Unlike the Constitution loss caused by an actual ghost, the lost points are of the temporary sort that can be slowly healed in the manner described in the Encounter section of the core rules. However, one reduced to zero Constitution will die and surely return as an undead spirit as well (TBD).

A ghost bear can only be hit by magical weapons or spells. As with all undead, they can be Turned by a Cleric (as vampire), and are immune to sleep, charm or hold spells. When (optional) druids are used in a campaign, they can Turn a ghost bear as if they were clerics of equivalent level.
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SmootRK
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Mink and Mink, Giant

Post Tue Feb 10, 2015 8:27 am

Mink
Armor Class: 15
Hit Dice: ½ (1d4 hp)
No. of Attacks: 1 bite
Damage: 1-2 bite
Movement: 30', Swim 50'
No. Appearing: 1d6
Save As: Normal Man
Morale: 7
Treasure Type: None *
XP: 10

Mink, Giant
Armor Class: 15
Hit Dice: 4+4
No. of Attacks: 1 bite
Damage: 1d8
Movement: 30', Swim 50'
No. Appearing: 1d4
Save As: Fighter: 4
Morale: 8
Treasure Type: None *
XP: 240

Mink is a common name for an alert semi-aquatic, carnivorous mammal of the mustelidae family. A mink falls somewhere between basically land-dwelling weasels and the even more aquatic otters. The furs of minks have been highly prized for its use in clothing. Minks use quick darting attacks, getting +1 on any initiative rolls, scoring vicious bites. Once a mink scores a bite, it can choose to hold on causing automatic damage each round. Groups encountered are always family units.

The Giant Mink is more commonly found in areas where other prehistoric (ice-age) creatures are found but otherwise conforms to typical mink behavior, being only larger and more dangerous.

* Both minks and their giant kin have valuable furs which keeps their numbers down in regions near settlements.
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SmootRK
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Owlbear, Northern

Post Sat Feb 14, 2015 2:02 pm

Owlbear, Northern
Armor Class: 16
Hit Dice: 8
No. of Attacks: 2 claws and 1 bite + 1 hug
Damage: 1d8 claws, 1d10 bite, 2d8 hug
Movement: 40' (Fly 60')
No. Appearing: 1, Wild 1d2, Lair 1d4
Save As: Fighter: 8
Morale: 9
Treasure Type: C
XP:

In a similar fashion to the standard owlbear, a Northern Owlbear mixes the qualities of polar bears and snow owls. They tend to be substantially larger than the southern climate owlbears.

Northern Owlbears fight much as do bears, but are more aggressive (as noted above). As with normal bears, a northern owlbear must hit with both claws in order to do the listed “hug” damage. As a polar climate inhabitant, they are essentially immune to cold environmental effects and even extreme or magical cold causes only half-damage. If a save is involved with such a cold-based effect, one receives a +4 bonus.

Occasionally a northern owlbear is hatched with large feathered wings giving it a Fly 60' movement.
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SmootRK
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Amarok

Post Sun Feb 15, 2015 2:36 pm

While usable in any setting, these were designed to supplant Gnolls in the setting I am working on lately. Quite similar in most respects though.

Amarok
Armor Class: 15 (13)
Hit Dice: 2
No. of Attacks: 1 weapon or 1 bite
Damage: 2d4 or by weapon +1, 1d6 bite
Movement: 30' Unarmored 40'
No. Appearing: 1d6, Wild 3d6, Lair 3d6
Save As: Fighter: 2
Morale: 8
Treasure Type: Q, S each; D, K in lair
XP: 75

The Amaroki (singular as Amarok) are lupine humanoids that form packs and hunt wide ranges in wilderness areas. They speak their own language of barks, growls, yaps and howls. An amorak's attitude mirrors that of wolves and is often rather aggressive towards other races. An amarok is substantially larger than a human reaching a height of 7½ feet tall when fully upright and with a weight of about 300 pounds. There is a wide variety of coat colors and patterns consisting of brown, black, gray, and white tones. Amaroki are often called wolfen by other races.

Amaroki are active predators, operating equally day or night but generally preferring being active at night. Each has Darkvision with a 30' range. They hunt effectively in packs, flanking and surrounding prey. Due to its strength, each has a +1 bonus on damage rolls when weapons are utilized.

One out of every six amaroki will be a seasoned warrior of 4 Hit Dice (240 XP) having a +2 bonus to damage due to strength. Amaroki gain a +1 bonus to their morale if they are led by such a warrior. In lairs of 12 or greater, there will be a pack leader of 6 Hit Dice (500 XP) having a +3 bonus to damage. In the lair, amaroki never fail a morale check as long as the pack leader is alive. In addition, a lair has a chance equal to 1-2 on 1d6 of a shaman being present, and 1 on 1d6 of a witch or warlock. A shaman is equivalent to a hardened warrior statistically, and in addition has Clerical abilities at level 1d4+1. A witch or warlock is equivalent to a regular amarok, and has Magic-User abilities of level 1d4.
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SmootRK
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Vihm (Ratling)

Post Sun Feb 15, 2015 3:12 pm

Again, in trying to go in a different direction than Euro inspired where I can. These little guys effectively replace the Kobold race and are quite equivalent otherwise.

Vihm (Ratling)
Armor Class: 13 (11)
Hit Dice: 1d4 Hit Points
No. of Attacks: 1 weapon
Damage: 1d4 or by weapon
Movement: 20' Unarmored 30'
No. Appearing: 4d4, Wild 6d10, Lair 6d10
Save As: Normal Man
Morale: 6
Treasure Type: P, Q each; C in lair
XP: 10

Vihm are small, nearly hairless, rodent-faced humanoids. They are often referred to as ratlings. A vihm is 2 to 2½ feet tall and weighs 35 to 45 pounds. Whenever possible, vihm set up ambushes near trapped areas with the goal of driving enemies into the traps, where other ratlings wait to utilize flaming oil, drop poisonous vermin, simply shoot the vitcims. Preferring to stay out of melee, vihm receive a bonus of +1 to hit and damage with ranged attacks. Vihm have Darkvision with a range of 60', and suffer a -1 penalty to attack rolls in bright sunlight or within the radius of light spells. Vihm typically wear various hides (equivalent to leather armor) in battle.

One out of every six vihm will be a warrior with one full Hit Die (25 XP). The vihm ratlings gain a +1 bonus to their morale if they are led by such a warrior. In vihm lairs, one out of every twelve will be a chieftain of 2 Hit Dice (75 XP) with an Armor Class of 14 (11) and having a +1 bonus to damage due to strength. In lairs of 30 or greater, there will be a vihm lord of 3 Hit Dice (145 XP) who wears heavier armor with an Armor Class of 15 (11) and a movement of 10', and who has a +1 bonus to damage. In the lair, vihm never fail a morale check as long as the vihm lord is alive. In addition, a lair has a chance equal to 1 on 1d6 of a shaman being present (or 1-2 on 1d6 if a vihm lord is present). A shaman is equivalent to a regular vihm statistically, but has Clerical abilities at level 1d4+1.

Vihm are quite cowardly but very cunning and view nearly all larger races as enemies. Strangely the vihm ratlings seem to prefer to live in proximity to these larger races, keeping to the nooks and crannies under the very noses of the larger races. The actual dens and burrows that vihm inhabit directly are extensively trapped.
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Hob

Post Mon Feb 16, 2015 6:09 pm

I've been hard at work on a supplement that I've not released yet. However, I can give a bit of a preview here. I present, the Hob.

Hob
Armor Class: 14 (11)
Hit Dice: 1-1
No. of Attacks: 1 weapon
Damage: 1d6 or by weapon
Movement: 20' Unarmored 30'
No. Appearing: 1d6, Lair 5d10
Save As: Thief: 1
Morale: 7
Treasure Type: R each
XP: 10

A Hob is a hairy creature who typically stands around 3' to 3 1/2' tall. Each has skin color that can range from a yellowish, through orange tones, to a red hue, with the occasional wart of a deeper, darker color. Eye colors range from gray, to brown to black, with the red glow of a nocturnal animal in them when light reflects off of them. Hair coloring ranges from shades of red to shades of brown. Hobs are related to the goblin races

A hob often wears old ratty looking clothing but otherwise takes great pride in his appearance. However, if you give a hob a set of new clothes, he will go away forever. Likewise, one takes pride in his work and is often found in civilized homes helping with chores. The only payment he will accept for his help is a bowl of porridge with a slab of butter on it. This pride also carries into the hob's personal life, though, and if he is offended, he can become a great nuisance until one makes amends with him.

Hobs have been known to serve in the night watch of cities and villages. In this capacity, the hob is as tenacious as his goblin cousins in defense of his home. A hob makes an excellent scout, and his skill with a short bow or crossbow match those of any goblin.

Hobs are a metropolitan lot, and typically live among other civilized races finding work as household servants. Hobs are also very clannish among themselves, and such clans will often form a community within a city, often within caves or catacombs below such settlements. This clan lair is called a Hob Hole. Hobs will choose a Clan Chief, who will run the day to day operations of the clan.

1 in 6 Hobs will be a warrior of 3-3 hit dice (145 XP). A Hob gains a +1 bonus to his morale if led by a warrior. In their lair 1 in 20 will be a Clan Elder of 5-5 hit dice (350 XP) with an Armor Class of 15 (11) that gains a +1 bonus to damage due to strength. In a lair of over 30 Hobs, there will be a Clan Chief of 7-7 Hit Dice (670 XP), with an Armor Class of 16 (11) and having a +1 bonus to damage. A Hob has a +2 bonus to morale while his Clan Chief is present (this is not cumulative with the bonus given by a warrior leader). In addition, a lair has a chance equal to 1 on 1d6 of a cleric being present (or 1-2 on 1d6 if a clan chief is present). A cleric is equivalent to a regular hob statistically, but has Clerical abilities at level 1d4+1.
Last edited by shadowmane on Sat Feb 21, 2015 9:55 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Hivelings

Post Wed Mar 18, 2015 3:12 pm

Hivelings
Armor Class: 15
Hit Dice: 1/2+2* (1d4+2)
No. of Attacks: 2 claws or 2 weapons or 1 claw and 1 weapon
Damage: 1d4 claws, 1d6 or by weapon
Movement: 50'
No. Appearing: 3d6 Wild 3d6 Lair 8d10
Save As: Magic-User 1
Morale: Special
Treasure Type: A

Hivelings are horrid little monsters, humanoids about the size of a goblin but covered almost totally with dark bristles like those of a wild boar. Only a hiveling's pale, evilly-grinning face is exposed. All hivelings in a group are indistinguishable, and they do not have any obvious gender; how they reproduce is a mystery.

Hivelings are connected together magically into a hive-mind. Their morale is equal to 2 plus the number of hivelings in the group (maximum 12). The interconnection between them is so powerful that, if one suffers damage, one point of the damage is transferred to each other allied hiveling within 40' until all other hivelings have taken a point of damage or there is just one point left; the remainder is all the damage the original hiveling will suffer. If a hiveling falls, any other hiveling having 2 or more hit points can spend one round in contact with the fallen one and give it half (rounded down) of its own current hit points. Similarly, healing magic will be divided point-by-point just as if it were damage, though undamaged hivelings will be passed over without receiving a point.

A hiveling has a +4 bonus for high Dexterity, which accounts for their armor class and also applies to all attacks with ranged weapons. Due to their slight stature, hivelings can only use small weapons such as short swords, daggers, slings, and so on, but they can attack freely with two melee weapons at no penalty. They also have the ability to pick pockets with a 65% chance of success, which they use in concert with their most significant ability: detection and identification of magic items.

A hiveling can detect the presence of magic items in a 30' radius, and can identify any magic item within 10'. As they are not particularly smart, hivelings will avoid items that are complex or have multiple abilities. Because they are linked with a hive mind, hivelings do not speak (though they do gibber madly when they attack, there is no meaning to it), and thus will avoid items related to speaking languages. Neither do they read or write, so they will not be interested in scrolls or spell books.

On the other hand, a hiveling can activate any magic item usable by a Magic-User (including, of course, those usable by any class); even one that requires command words can be used, without need to actually speak the words. A hiveling is entirely capable of using a wand of fireballs, for example.

Any time a hiveling detects an "interesting" magic item, all other hivelings in its group will act intelligently to try to acquire the item. If two or more hivelings can engage the holder of the item in combat, any who can flank that character will attempt to steal the item. Remember that all hivelings know everything that any member of their group knows. If the hivelings are badly injured, they may seek out any character carrying a healing potion and attempt to steal it or slay the one carrying it, so they can use it themselves.

Even if a group of hivelings has 12 Morale, they may choose to abandon combat when they believe they have acquired all the interesting items held by their enemies.
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Thunderbird

Post Thu Apr 16, 2015 9:26 am

Enough break. Here is another new monster. I hope to get one or more each week.

Thunderbird
Armor Class: 17
Hit Dice: 5*
No. of Attacks: 2 claws 1 bite, dive
Damage: 1d6 claws 1d8 bite, dive (charge) +lightning
Movement: 10' fly 90'
No. Appearing: 1
Save As: Fighter: 5
Morale: 9
Treasure Type: Nil
XP: 405

As rare as giant eagles are, a Thunderbird is even more rare. Equally large as giant eagles, one is about 10 feet tall with wingspan of 20 feet, and has coloration that includes various hues of electric-blue. In fact, the very air around a thunderbird crackles and sparks with static electricity. Thunderbirds are intelligent and often speak the local common language.

A thunderbird typically attacks from a great height, diving earthward at tremendous speed (use charging rules). In addition to the normal attack routine, while diving a bolt of lightning trails the thunderbird striking its target as well for 5d6 electrical damage (equivalent to the thunderbird's hit dice). Those within 10 feet of the target take half that damage, but the target or those nearby get a save vs. Dragon Breath for one-half damage as well (ie half or one-quarter damage respectively). When it cannot dive, it uses its powerful talons and slashing beak to strike at its target’s head and eyes. Anyone striking a thunderbird with a metallic weapon will take 1d6 electrical damage in return (no save). A thunderbird is completely immune to any electrical based damage.
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