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Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 4:24 pm
by AJS1956
I've recently re-watched the BBC's 'Walking With Monsters' so here is;

Eurypterid

Small // Medium
AC: 14 // 16
HD: 1 // 2
Attks: 2 claws // 2 claws
Dge: 1d4/1d4 // 1d6/1d6
Move: 20' swim 30' // 20' swim 40'
App: 1d4 // 1d4
Save: F1 // F2
Morale: 9 // 9
Treas: None // None
XP: 25 // 75

Large // Small
AC: 18 // 14
HD: 4 // 1*
Attks: 2 claws // 2 claws, 1 sting
Dge: 1d8/1d8 // 1d4/1d4/poison
Move: 10' swim 50' // 20' swim 30'
App: 1d4 // 1d4
Save: F4 // F1
Morale: 9 // 9
Treas: None // None
XP: 240 // 37

Known to some as sea scorpions, eurypterids are amphibious arthropods related to arachnids. Primeval and voracious, these predators ranged in size from relatively harmless eurypterids the size of a small dog up to large ones the size of a cow. Regardless of their size, all share one thing in common - an aggressive attitude. Eurypterids lash out at anything that might be food, happily secure in their flat, stout carapace. Although quite at home in the shallow sea (or fresh water lake), most eurypterids are capable of scuttling around on land and can exist out of water indefinitely.

There is a small amount of evidence that some species of eurypterids were poisonous, but all of these were of the small variety. Those stung by a poisonous eurypterid must save vs. Poison at +2 or die.

Eurypterids include; Buffalopterus (Small), Megalograptus (Small, poisonous), Pentecopterus (Medium), and Jaekelopterus (Large).


Andy Scarfe

Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:12 am
by chiisu81
This is a nice entry 8-) But I think it might be better to split up the different "sub-entries" like we've done some others. In that there's first the "Eurypterid" entry with the basic description, etc. And then present the stat-blocks and specific info for each one, so it'd be:
- Eurypterid, Buffalopterus
- Eurypterid, Jaekelopterus
- Eurypterid, Megalograptus
- Eurypterid, Pentecopterus

Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:46 pm
by AJS1956
Thank you. Checking the rules again shows that you're right, of course. The Eurypterid needs separate listings for each different species.

As I have now begun the ' Walking with Beasts' DVD I can offer;

Cynodictis

AC: 14
HD: 2
Attacks: 1 bite
Damage: 1d8
Move: 60'
No App: 1d4
Save: Fighter 2
Morale: 6
Treasure: None
XP: 75

Cynodictis was one of the many species of a group of animals commonly known as "bear dogs", which, as the name suggests, had several characteristics of bears and dogs. But they were only related to the said animals, not ancestors or transitional forms. Cynodictis was considerably smaller than other bear dogs only being slightly larger than the modern day opossum with a height of about 12 inches.
Cynodictis had great speed and it would use this speed to hunt its prey, such as rabbits and small rodents, though they sometimes would scavenge. Because of their small size, they feared the larger carnivores in their region. They lived in dens in steep riverbanks that they built themselves, lined with moulted fur and vegetation. These dens would also be used by Cynodictis mothers to raise their pups. These bear dogs would give birth to as many as five pups where they could be cared for by their mother for several months. A mother Cynodictis would be brave enough to attack larger animals to protect her young and should be considered to have a morale of 9

Andy

Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 4:43 pm
by SmootRK
AJS1956 wrote:Thank you. Checking the rules again shows that you're right, of course. The Eurypterid needs separate listings for each different species.

As I have now begun the ' Walking with Beasts' DVD I can offer;

Cynodictis

AC: 14
HD: 2
Attacks: 1 bite
Damage: 1d8
Move: 60'
No App: 1d4
Save: Fighter 2
Morale: 6
Treasure: None
XP: 75

Cynodictis was one of the many species of a group of animals commonly known as "bear dogs", which, as the name suggests, had several characteristics of bears and dogs. But they were only related to the said animals, not ancestors or transitional forms. Cynodictis was considerably smaller than other bear dogs only being slightly larger than the modern day opossum with a height of about 12 inches.
Cynodictis had great speed and it would use this speed to hunt its prey, such as rabbits and small rodents, though they sometimes would scavenge. Because of their small size, they feared the larger carnivores in their region. They lived in dens in steep riverbanks that they built themselves, lined with moulted fur and vegetation. These dens would also be used by Cynodictis mothers to raise their pups. These bear dogs would give birth to as many as five pups where they could be cared for by their mother for several months. A mother Cynodictis would be brave enough to attack larger animals to protect her young and should be considered to have a morale of 9

Andy

I feel like this one is begging for Giant variant. :twisted:

Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 7:23 am
by AJS1956
Hi,

Next up are these little (?) beauties;

Diprotodon

AC: 15 [14]
HD: 4 [2]
Attack: 1 bite
Damage: 1d6 [1d4]
Move: 20'
No. App.: Wild 2d4
Save: Fighter 4 [Fighter 2]
Morale: 6 [5]
Treas: None
XP: 240 [75]

Diprotodons were very large early relatives of modern wombats. Marsupial herbivores, they are heavily built quadrupeds about man-height at the shoulders and twice that in length. Diprotodons prefer dry plains, savannahs or open woodlands

Male diprotodons are much larger than the females but are more rarely encountered. Use the values in brackets for female diprotodons. Diprotodons are usually encountered in small family groups of one male, several females and young.

Entelodont

AC: 16
HD: 6
Attack: 1 bite
Damage: 2d6
Move:50
No. App.: 1
Save: Fighter 6
Morale: 10
Treas: None
XP: 500

These omnivorous creatures are distant relatives of modern hippos and boars. They stood two meters tall, were aggressive and built like tanks with an upturned jaw used to attack the underbelly of its prey, but had a brain no bigger than an orange.

Megaloceros (Irish Deer)

AC: 14
HD: 7
Attack: 1 kick
Damage: 2d4
Move: 60'
No. App.: Wild 2d8
Save: Fighter 7
Morale: 7
Treas: None
XP: 670

These herbivores stood about seven feet tall at the shoulder and had enormous antlers up to 12 feet, tip to tip. Sometimes called Irish Elk, they are not elk but early ancestors of modern deer. Like other species of deer the megaloceros was a herbivore and not dangerous unless the herd is threatened or if approaching males during the mating season.

Paraceratherium (Indricotherium)

AC: 13
HD: 12
Attack: 1 kick
Damage: 2d8
Move: 20'
No. App.: Wild 1d3
Save: Fighter 12
Morale: 6
Treas: None
XP: 1,875

An ancestor of the modern rhinoceros, the 15-to-20-ton paraceratherium had a relatively long neck and surprisingly thin legs with three-toed feet. This huge herbivore probably possessed a prehensile upper lip - not quite a trunk, but an appendage flexible enough to allow it to grab and tear the tall leaves of trees. It does not have a horn.

The immense paraceratherium, the largest land mammal known to have existed, stands nearly 18 feet high at the shoulder and measures 30 feet from end to end. Despite its size, it lives a peaceful life pulling leaves from the tops of trees unless startled into action. When panicked, a paraceratherium tramples any obstacle in its path. If confronted or if defending its young, it smashes its tormentors with its elephantine feet.

Like many extinct creatures, the paraceratherium has had a number of different scientific names including Indricotherium and Baluchitherium.

Megabeasts

After the fall of the dinosaurs, mammals ruled the earth and grew to enormous size. The following creatures are some of those which roamed the earth before modern humans.

From 'Core Rules'
Bear, Cave
Caveman
Crocodile, Giant {Deinosuchus]
Hyenodon
Mastodon
Sabre-Toothed Cat
Titanothere

From 'Basic Fantasy Field Guide'
Ape, Gigantopithecus
Elephant, Shovel-Tusk
Glyptodon
Megatherium
Terror Bird

From 'Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3'
Cynodictis
Diprotodon
Entelodont
Megaloceros
Paraceratherium

---

Most of the megabeasts that have appeared in the Core Rules and Field Guide 1 are pretty big so I'm trying to show a few of the smaller ones to give DMs a wider range if they want a 'prehistoric' or 'Lost World' area on their world. This is why I didn't do a Giant Cynodictis.

Andy

Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 11:19 am
by SmootRK
Andy, your efforts will go right into my ongoing campaign. My campaign is rather a mash-up of elements but with heavy focus on Paleo/Lost World/semi-ice age sorta North America vibe for flora and fauna, with a lot of the traditional races and stuff mixed in.

Good stuff

Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:07 pm
by AJS1956
OK,

Here's the last for now. Hope these help.

Aurochs

AC: 14
HD: 5
Atks: 1 charge
Dmge: 3d8
Move: 50' charge 60'
No. App: Wild 2d6
Save: F5
Morale: 7
Treasure: None
XP: 360

Aurochs were large cattle and the ancestors of all modern types of cattle. Longer-legged than modern cattle, they were all horned, both bulls and cows. For cows use the stats for the Bull (Basic Fantasy Field Guide 2 page 15) with morale 6 and move 60'.

Castoroides (Giant Beaver)

AC: 14
HD: 4
Atks: 1 bite
Dmge: 2d6
Move: 30', swim 30'
No. App: Wild 1, Lair 1d4
Save: F4
Morale: 6
Treasure: None
XP: 240

The North American Giant Beaver was an amphibious rodent of extraordinary size. Adults were frequently up to six feet long and could be as large as seven. Excellent swimmers, their teeth were not ideally suited for bringing down trees so probably did not make dams.

Neochoerus

This was an early rodent, ancestor of modern rats and capybara. use the standard Giant Rat (BF RPG Core Rules page 111).

Andy

Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 4:43 pm
by Daucuscarota
Edit: As suggested by chiisu81, I changed "temporary" to "temporal", and "temporariness" to "temporal shift."

I'm not used to make monsters with complete stats and descriptions, much less in English (I speak Spanish). So if you find any mistakes, feel free to point them out to me.

Temporal spider

Armor Class: 13
Hit Dice: 4**
No. of Attacks: 1 bite, cobweb
Damage: 1d6 bite + poison
Movement: 30' Climb 30' Web 60'
No. Appearing: 1, Wild 1d3
Save As: Fighter 4
Morale: 10
Treausre Type: None
XP: 320

This spider is about the size of a pony and of an indefinite iridescent black color with a pearlescence "hourglass" in its abdomen. It's general look is that of a jewel carved in the shape of arachnid, so it's both appaling and beautiful. It has Darkvision with an 80' range.

The temporal spider is not usually aggressive but a passive hunter, but when it feels menaced, it will attack with two sharp fangs extended as daggers. Those hit by the fangs must save vs. Poison or lose 1d6 hp per round for a number of rounds equal to the rounds the spider remains in the present time (temporal shift).

Temporal spiders don't belong to this time, they're from either the far future or the primeval past, nobody knows for sure. But they're here temporarily, to feed, weaving their webs of silvery threads that attract they prey. They are subject to temporal shift: They can remain in the present time for some time; after this time, it vanishes and returns its own time, taking with it its web and any entangled prey caught in it.

Whenever a creature or character is in contact with the spider's cobweb, he must save vs. Paralyzation or get entangled. Every following round, add a cumulative -1 penalty to the saving throw to break free. This penaly represents further entanglement. When breaking free becomes impossible, or the spider and web leave present time, any creature entangled counts as dead.

To determine temporal shift, roll 1d6 and compare the result to the next table:

1 = 4d4 hours
2 = 1d6 turns (10-60 minutes)
3 = 1d10 minutes (up to one turn)
4, 5, 6 = 1d10 rounds (up to 100 seconds)

Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:32 pm
by chiisu81
Maybe instead of "temporary" can call it "temporal"; and instead of "temporariness" maybe "temporal shift" or such?

Re: Basic Fantasy Field Guide 3

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:27 pm
by Daucuscarota
chiisu81 wrote:Maybe instead of "temporary" can call it "temporal"; and instead of "temporariness" maybe "temporal shift" or such?


Sure. It's better, I agree. I edited the entry to reflect the changes.